Monday, February 16, 2009

Succulents, Allied Artists of America, Artist tip # 7

" Succulents II "
Oil
42"x42"
Artist's Collection


Back in 1985 I took some time from my batik paintings to do a few oils. This one I entered in the annual Allied Artists of America show in NYC. It won the Gilmore/Romans award for oil. I decided I couldn't part with it so it has hung in my home all these years! I still love it, but if someone is interested in purchasing it please contact me. I find as I get older I'm not as attached to things as I once was. I'm also getting geared up in my head to continue this succulent series. I posted another one some time ago.

Artist tip #7: I always tone my canvas and panels. You now have a mid-value surface to judge color against and it gives overall harmony..especially if you lift off color. On Succulents II I used cadmium yellow light oil thinned with turp. In the last 10 years I haven't used any turpentine in my studio..too toxic. Instead I clean brushes with mineral spirits or Turpenoid natural. Current favorite colors to tone with: yellow oxide or raw sienna...acrylic..it dries fast.

13 comments:

Fábio Cembranelli said...

Hi Jennifer! Beautiful work, amazing colors, as always. I tagged you. Have you been tagged yet? The tagging rules are in my blog.Thanks!

Jennifer Bellinger said...

Thanks Fabio,
Yes, I have been tagged twice so far. I sorry I will have to pass this time..I'm crazy busy at the moment but I so appreciate that you thought of me.

Nancy and the fatties said...

Jennifer, I bet this is breathtaking in person, such a large piece, no wonder you held onto it! I can see that yellow underpainting peeking through! can't wait to see more of you succulents in the future.

Christine Mercer-Vernon said...

this is so beautiful jennifer. i remember being struck by it on your website when i first found you. i didn't realize it was so big, it must make quite an impression on the wall. i've always been a fan of working big, i find it to be much easier than working small.

Jennifer Bellinger said...

Thanks Nancy. The yellow underpainting ads glow in the thinly painted areas of green, a bonus effect of toning.

Jennifer Bellinger said...

Thanks, Christine. While working big is wonderful I have learned so much about myself as a painter by doing the Daily Painting process on little panels. Such gratification in completing something in a day. Using a small painting as a study for a large work isn't easy. The composition may work but you need to add more information to the larger shapes to keep it all interesting. I find I am bored by the process and would rather just design and paint a large piece for its own sake and paint the little guys as little guys. I loose some of the freshness otherwise. It's similar to what happens when doing a color sketch for a large oil commission. When I go to do the painting it's like I am copying what has already been done. Nice for the client, but a struggle for me, but one I have learned to accept, too. It's just how it is.

Jennifer Bellinger said...

Oh, Christine I forgot to mention. This painting is the second in the series, not the one you saw on my soon to be old website. Here's the link if you want to see:
http://www.blogger.com/post-edit.g?blogID=643591416765136797&postID=2959466908813525728

Christine Mercer-Vernon said...

OH my look at that! well they are both fabulous paintings. i agree with you on the daily paintings, i never take them to a larger format because as you said, it requires more information, and i think that takes away what attracted me to the composition in the first place. i'm with you on the 'copying' feeling too. i will do b/w drawings and sometimes color studies in marker or colored pencil first, just to work out a general palette, but i like to stay away from a painted color sketch because then i feel like i lose the spontaneity in my color choices. i tend to be too linear sometimes and can't break from what i previously did.

on a side note, i think you should keep this painting. :)

kim shields said...

wow, when I saw this one. Then I saw the size, a bigger WOW! Would love to see this one in person.

Jennifer Bellinger said...

Thanks, Kim. I plan to add to this series soon with a few more succulents (Hens & Chicks, which grow well here in our high mountain climate) and I also have some great photos of rows of red cabbages that a friend raises.

Faye Taylor said...

Jennifer,
The Hens & Chicks are my favorite of your work. The are softly painted and very appealing.

Jennifer Bellinger said...

Thanks, Faye. We still have snow in the yard but yesterday I noticed the Hens & Chicks were looking good, survived another cold winter! Why they like this climate I don't know.

kumar said...

Hey, Very nice paiting. I perticularly like the colours.

In case you want to see my work:
http://www.watercolours-kumar.blogspot.com/