Thursday, September 17, 2009

Still Life with Bartlett Pear

" One Pear "
Oil
8"x8"
I call this a funny little painting! Funny because it was a non-serious effort using pastel background colors that I would normally shy away from..not bold enough. I also like the little bit of lean to the left the pear has. I think what holds it together are the little dark punches I put in with a palette knife to create contrast. It kept me busy while my students were focusing on their work in between needing my help.

7 comments:

Caio Fernandes said...

again , the way you use the colors is incredible .

Jennifer Bellinger said...

Thanks, Caio. I forgot to mention the orange paper lining the wall on the right side of my set-up box that bounces that warm orange on the right side of the pear. I merely paint the value/colors that I see. Trust your eyes, not your brain is how I paint.

Gwen Bell said...

Great colors and really interesting geometric shapes. Nice work!

Jennifer Bellinger said...

Thanks, Gwen. I fun time using softer colors than my usual bold palette.

Mary Sheehan Winn said...

This is very 'Henry Hensche' Cape Cod School color vibration. I like it. I also like how you are stepping out of the box.

Jennifer Bellinger said...

Hi Mary,
My teaching method, what you see, not what you know is based on Hawthorne..so, as a contemporary of Hensche I can see the resemblence. Years ago, I bought the book by Arthur Stern, now a classic and expensive but well worth the price. Stern leads you through a series of studies with a basic palette. If you paint the color as you see it, the value takes care of itself. Sounds simple, takes careful observation and color mixing. The yield is beautiful color, especially in the shadows.

Jennifer Bellinger said...

Hi Mary,
My teaching method, what you see, not what you know is based on Hawthorne..so, as a contemporary of Hensche I can see the resemblence. Years ago, I bought the book by Arthur Stern, now a classic and expensive but well worth the price. Stern leads you through a series of studies with a basic palette. If you paint the color as you see it, the value takes care of itself. Sounds simple, takes careful observation and color mixing. The yield is beautiful color, especially in the shadows.